Image: Wayne Taylor/Fairfax Media

Electronic music is finally having its #metoo moment. But we need a binding code of conduct to make the scene a safer place

Last year, the death of Erick Morillo triggered what felt like electronic music’s #metoo moment. The stories of sexual assault and sexual harassment that emerged in the wake of Morillo’s death, joining the sexual battery charge that he had been due to face court for, revealed that Morillo had been attacking women for as long as he’d been spinning records — and getting away with it.

For many survivors, Morillo’s sudden death cheated them of the opportunity…


Four months ago, I had a rude awakening about the magnitude and virulence of misogyny in electronic music. I knew that women, trans people and non-binary people had always been undervalued in the scene, but I had no idea of just how insidious and widespread the problem was until I witnessed the online response to the death of chronic sexual predator Erick Morillo. Recently charged with rape, he was publicly mourned and celebrated following his passing — even after many victims shared their stories of his abuse, supported by witnesses.

Daniel Wang’s Facebook post this week — describing his elation…


“Can we just let Erick rest in peace now?”, some people (mostly men) might ask, rolling their eyes. The answer is no, no we cannot.

In the same way that the George Floyd protests sparked the long-overdue realisation that the electronic music industry is racist to the core (something that Black people have always known), the outpouring of fawning tributes for Erick Morillo has yet again reminded women, trans women and non-binary people in the scene of how little they matter in the eyes of their male peers.

There is no denying Erick’s musical legacy. A house legend, an incredible…


In the midst of one of the darkest chapters in recent human history, the past ten days have been full of more pain, sadness and rage, but also, crucially, a sliver of light.

The sickening murder of George Floyd, which served to highlight so many other deaths of Black people at the hands of police as well as the more generalised white supremacy that has gone largely unchecked for centuries, feels like a moment of reckoning.

It might have taken a global pandemic for us to reach breaking point, or to be far enough removed from our own bullshit to…

Annabel Ross

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